IOF-Servier Young Investigator Research Grant

IOF Servier Young Investigator Award medalThe IOF-Servier Young Investigator Research Grant supported by the Servier Research group in partnership with IOF was presented from the years 2000 to 2014. It awarded 40,000 EUR towards original research of significant value and international relevance in the field of osteoporosis by researchers aged 40 years or under.

Award recipients 2000-2014

 

 

2014 IOF-Servier Young Investigator Research Grant

The grant was awarded to Charlotte Beaudart and Emmanuel Biver MD at the opening of the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases in Seville, Spain in April 2014. The Award winners’ joint project aims to develop and validate a sarcopenia-specific quality-of-life (QoL) tool, which will then be used to assess the impact of the disease on QoL in two prospective cohorts. Sarcopenia, which affects seniors, is characterized by loss of muscle mass and strength, which in turn affects balance, gait and overall ability to perform tasks of daily living.

2013 IOF-Servier Young Investigator Research Grant

The 2013 grant was awarded to Charlotte Beaudart and Emmanuel Biver MD at the opening of the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases in Seville, Spain. The Award winners’ joint project aims to develop and validate a sarcopenia-specific quality-of-life (QoL) tool, which will then be used to assess the impact of the disease on QoL in two prospective cohorts.

2012 IOF-Servier Young Investigator Research Grant

The 2012 grant was awarded to Dr Mark Edwards, clinical research fellow at the MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit at Southhampton General Hospital in the UK. Dr Edwards’ project seeks to clarify uncertainties with regard to the relationships between body composition, muscle and bone health. As most fragility fractures occur following a fall, age-related loss in skeletal muscle, known as sarcopenia, may contribute to fracture risk through increasing fall risk. By contrast, while obesity is associated with reduced bone loss, observed fracture rates are unexpectedly high in obese people. The proposed study, which will recruit 45o men and women, will assess the relationship between muscle strength, measures of adiposity and bone mineral density, in both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. The results may inform fracture prediction algorithms and enhance the development of future randomised controlled trial studies.

2010 IOF-Servier Young Investigator Research Grant

The 2010 Grant was awarded to co-winners Dr. Frank DeVries, University of Utrecht, the Netherlands, and Dr. Davide Ruffoni, Institute for Biomechanics, ETH Zurich, Switzerland during the IOF WCO-ECCEO10 in Florence, Italy. Dr. Frank de Vries’ project, ‘Absolute risk of fractures in patients with bariatric surgery: a population based cohort study’ seeks to estimate the risk of fracture in patients who have undergone bariatric surgery (for example, reduction of stomach size through gastric banding) compared to morbidly obese patients who have not had surgery. In addition, the study aims to estimate the absolute 5-year and 10-year risk of fracture in bariatric surgery patients.

Co-winner Dr. Davide Ruffoni’s project is entitled ‘Microstructural characterization of peri-implant bone response in an in vivo mouse model’. Its aim is to achieve a better understanding of the mechanisms of implant integration, anchorage and failure in osteoporotic bone, hopefully leading to novel strategies in the management of osteoporotic fractures.

 2008 IOF-Servier Young Investigator Research Grant

Dr. Roger Zebaze, Research Fellow at the Department of Endocrinology, Austin Health, at the University of Melbourne wins 2008 IOF-Servier Young Investigator Research Grant. Dr. Roger Zebaze, Research Fellow at the Department of Endocrinology, Austin Health, at the University of Melbourne wins 2008 IOF-Servier Young Investigator Research Grant. Dr. Roger Zebaze, Research Fellow at the Department of Endocrinology, Austin Health, at the University of Melbourne has been named the winner of the 2008 IOF-Servier Young Investigator Research Grant. The Grant was awarded on March 18, 2009 at the ECCEO9-IOF meeting held in Athens.

Dr. Zebaze’s winning project will investigate whether reduced bone strength due to structural abnormalities, independent of bone mineral density, contributes to distal radius fractures in childhood. Although these fractures occur in circumstances of trauma, it is likely that underlying bone fragility is a contributing factor. Using a new peripheral computed tomography, Dr. Zebaze’s project will directly quantify and compare bone structure and strength (by FEA) in subjects with distal radius fractures with non-fracture peers matched by sex, age and pubertal status.

Fractures in children are as common as in elderly people and their direct and indirect costs to society are considerable. The results of the project will ultimately help devise adequate preventative and therapeutic measures for childhood fractures.

2006 IOF-Servier Young Investigator Research Grant

Dr. Elise Feng-i Morgan, of Boston University, received the 2006 IOF-Servier Young Investigator Grant (formerly 'Award'), presented during the 2006 IOF World Congress on Osteoporosis (IOF WCO) in Toronto, Canada. Dr. Morgan, who is Assistant Professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, at Boston University, USA, won this award for her proposal to use three-dimensional visualization to understand how spine fractures start and progress, and then to test models to predict vertebral fracture.

“Dr. Feng-i Morgan’s project to use the latest techniques from aerospatial and mechanical engineering to understand how vertebrae fracture, caught the judges attention as it will contribute to widening our knowledge of osteoporosis,” said IOF President Prof. Pierre D. Delmas.

2004 IOF-Servier Young Investigator Research Grant

The winner of the 2004 IOF-Servier Young Investigator Research Award, presented at the 2004 IOF World Congress on Osteoporosis in Rio de Janeiro, is Professor Hong-Wen Deng. Prof. Hong-Wen Deng, who holds a tenured position at Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska, USA, and also a secondary appointment at HuNan Normal University, China, won the Award for his proposal to study comparative genetics of osteoporosis in Caucasians and Asians (Chinese).


2002 IOF-Servier Young Investigator Research Grant

Dr. Yunbo Duan was awarded the 2002 award for his project, "Are racial differences in periosteal apposition during aging responsible for the racial differences in bone fragility: Studies in Asians and Caucasians".

It focuses on the structural and biomechanical basis responsible for the racial differences in fracture rates between Asians and Caucasians. Dr. Duan's hypothesis is that racial differences in periosteal expansion during aging may contribute, in part, to the racial differences in bone fragility at the spine and hip.

A cross-sectional study will be conducted in 500 healthy Chinese men and 500 Chinese women age ranged 18 to 85 years living in Melbourne, Australia. Dr. Duan is currently a research fellow in the Department of Endocrinology and Medicine, University of Melbourne, Australia.

2000 IOF-Servier Young Investigator Research Grant

The innaugral IOF-Servier Young Investigator Research Grantwas presented at the IOF World Congress on Osteoporosis in June 2000 to two young investigators who shared the award.

Freda Wynne of the University College of Cork, Ireland is working on a project which aims to identify the gene(s) responsible for susceptibility to low bone mineral density (BMD) in the Irish population. The project involves the collection and analysis of blood samples from an extensive set of families with low BMD. The identification of the genes which may be responsible for predisposition to osteoporosis will lead to the development of a genetic test to identify individuals at risk so that they may be targeted for preventative measures or specific treatments.

The second project, that of Dr. Luigi Gennari of the University of Florence, Italy, studies the genetics of male osteoporosis. Dr. Gennari will perform a longitudinal clinical study (2-3 years) on 500 elderly men. The results of the study are expected to uncover possible relationships between polymorphisms in male genes and bone mass, bone turnover or bone loss.