Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis in Men: Why change needs to happen
Authored by Prof. Peter Ebeling, this 24-page referenced report in A4 format is a comprehensive guide to osteoporosis prevention in men. It provides valuable information for educators, healthcare professionals, healthcare authorities, as well as patients who want more in-depth information. It can also be used as a lobbying tool to show ‘why change needs to happen’. The report covers the following... Read more
This new report prepared in collaboration with the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) and the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industry Associations, is the first to describe in detail the epidemiology, burden, and treatment of osteoporosis in all 27 member states of the European Union (EU27)*. Read more
The ScoreCard for Osteoporosis in Europe (SCOPE) aims to facilitate and promote health care policies that will help to ensure that all Europeans have access to the best diagnosis and treatment to reduce their risk of osteoporosis and fr Read more
Osteoporosis, which literally means porous bone, is a disease in which the density and quality of bone are reduced. As bones become more porous and fragile, the risk of fracture is greatly increased. The loss of bone occurs silently and progressively. Often there are no symptoms until the first fracture occurs. Read more
Nutrition and bone, muscle and joint health are closely related. A healthy diet can help you prevent and manage osteoporosis and related musculoskeletal disorders by assisting in the production and maintenance of bone. Conversely, if you're not getting the right nutrients you're putting yourself at greater risk for bone, muscle and joint disease. So which nutrients should you be getting, and what... Read more
Vitamin D is essential for the development and maintenance of bone, both for its role in assisting calcium absorption from food in the intestine, and for ensuring the correct renewal and mineralization of bone tissue. The type of vitamin D made in the skin is referred to as vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol), whereas the dietary form can be vitamin D3 or a closely related molecule of plant origin known... Read more
Fixed risk factors determine whether an individual is at heightened risk of osteoporosis. Also, unlike modifiable risks, they are factors which we can’t change, including age, gender and family history. Read more
Most modifiable risk factors, which arise primarily because of unhealthy diet or lifestyle choices, directly impact bone biology and result in a decrease in bone mineral density (BMD). Some modifiable risk factors also increase the risk of fracture independently of their effect on bone itself.The good news is everyone can take steps to reduce these risk factors for osteoporosis and related... Read more
Because bone loss is gradual and painless, there are usually no symptoms to indicate a person is developing osteoporosis. This is why osteoporosis is often referred to as the silent disease. Often the first symptom of osteoporosis is a fracture. Most commonly, osteoporotic fractures occur at the spine, the wrist or the hip, although osteoporotic fractures can occur in other bones as well. Read more
Bones in our body are living tissue. They have their own blood vessels and are made of living cells, which help them to grow and to repair themselves. As well, proteins, minerals and vitamins make up the bone. We are born with about 300 soft bones. During childhood and adolescence, the cartilage grows and is slowly replaced by hard bone. Some of these bones later fuse together, so that the adult... Read more

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