Osteoporosis

Our bones are living tissue that give our body structure, allow us to move and protect our organs. Osteoporosis is a condition where bones become thin and  lose their strength. This can lead to fractures, which cause pain and make everyday activities extremely difficult. After a hip fracture, about one-quarter of people die or never walk again. 

It’s estimated over 200 million women have osteoporosis. That’s more than the combined populations of the Germany, the United Kingdom and France.

Worldwide, one in three women and one in five men over the age of fifty will experience an osteoporotic fracture.

In fact, every three seconds a bone will break, somewhere in the world, because of this disease.

Many people won’t know they have osteoporosis until their first fracture, which is why it’s called the ‘silent disease’. Even after a break, it often goes untreated.

The good news is osteoporosis can be diagnosed and treated and fractures often prevented through healthy lifestyle choices.
 

Our Bone Health Advocates

Baroness Julia Cumberlege, member House of Lords, former UK health minister, prominent osteoporosis advocate. Message on the occasion of the 2nd IOF Women Leaders Roundtable, 2006

It does seem incredible that a disease that can be diagnosed and can be successfully treated is not a major health issue. We must do all we can to prevent, treat and ultimately cure this painful and life restricting disease.

Manasnan Panlertwongsakul, Thailand actress

I hope the campaign will help spread the information and make people take precautions, take a lot of calcium and take care of their health.

Ilie Nastase, tennis champion

It is very important that we are moving, continually moving. It doesn’t matter what we do; exercise, or playing tennis or soccer. We have to move and it is also good for the muscles, not only for the bones. If you want to prevent osteoporosis do like me: have babies when you are over 60 so they can run you all over the place.